<12 ...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 14>

The Origins of the New South


Reconfiguration of southern agriculture
African American sharecroppers who were evicted from their crops, Arkansas 1936
African American sharecroppers who were evicted from their crops, Arkansas 1936


Sharecropping:
  • After the Civil War, many freed African Americans needed work
  • Many of them turned to sharecropping (also called tenant farming)
    • A worker and a land owner split the profits from the crops
      • Land owner provided the worker with room, food, equipment in exchange for the worker growing the crops
      • Unfair because most land owners forced long work days, provided unsuitable room, and did not split profits equally
        • Often resulted in the worker "owing" more to the land owner and becoming indebted
          • New form of slavery
multicultural.pngprimary_sources.PNGClick here for more information on sharecropping, including contracts and pictures
multicultural.pngprimary_sources.PNGClick here for the PBS site "Slavery by Another Name"


Crop-lien System:
  • Farmers and workers could make arrangements with merchants
    • Take supplies needed for their farms without paying until crops were gathered
      • Risky, because if the crops weren't bountiful, they might owe more money than what they have
      • Created a lot of debt

Click here for more information on the crop-lien system






Expansion of manufacturing and industrialization

rotating gif.gifSee USII.I for information on the start of industrialization




Politics of segregation: Jim Crow and disenfranchisement

rotating gif.gifSee USI.40 for information on the voting bloc of the south


rotating gif.gifSee USI.41 for information on Jim Crow laws and segregation







Sources:
Coffman, Standard 13: The Origins of the New South