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The "Committee of Five" that drafted the U.S. Declaration of Independence:  Roger Sherman, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams and Robert Livingston
The "Committee of Five" that drafted the U.S. Declaration of Independence: Roger Sherman, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams and Robert Livingston


Key Concept 3.2: The American Revolution’s democratic and republican ideals inspired new experiments with different forms of government.
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For resources, see





  • Grade 5.17 on the Revolutionary War
    • Grade 5.18 for achievements of important leaders during the Revolution





Key Concept 3.3: Migration within North America and competition over resources, boundaries and trade intensified conflicts among peoples and nations.

Rotating_globe-small.gifPaspahegh, a virtual recreation of a Native American village in Virginia from Virtual Jamestown.

primary_sources.PNGPortsmouth Peace Treaty of 1713 was negotiated with the Wabanaki people of New Hampshire and Maine and English colonists at the end of Queen Anne's War.
  • The treaty was a treaty of submission in which native peoples, used an oral tradition, agreed to written limitations on their territories and rights, including boundaries and promises that were subsequently broken by European colonists.
  • It acknowledged New Hampshire's government as separate from Massachusetts.
  • It opened Portsmouth as a commercial and military hub.

rotating gif.gifFor more on relationships between native peoples and Europeans, see Grade 5.6



Additional Teaching and Learning Resources


primary_sources.PNGFor information on colonist reactions to acts Great Britain imposed on America, visit Making the Revolution: Crisis 1763-1775, where you can find compilations of primary documents from Patriot and Loyalist colonists.

book.pngSee also Re-Examining the Revolution by Ray Raphael from his book, Founding Myths: Stories That Hide Our Patriotic Past, 2004.

Betsy Ross presenting the "Betsy Ross flag" to George Washington (image from 1917)
Betsy Ross presenting the "Betsy Ross flag" to George Washington (image from 1917)

primary_sources.PNG100 Milestone Documents. See also Making the Revolution: America 1763-1791 from the National Humanities Center.

For background, see The Coming of the American Revolution from the Massachusetts Historical Society.


Female_Rose.pngThe Truth about Betsy Ross from Colonial Williamsburg discusses the forming of the American flag. See also Betsy Ross entry on the Influential Women in American History page.

external image 200px-Paperback_book_black_gal.svg.pngWrong and Dangerous: Ten Right-Wing Myths about Our Constitution. Garrett Epps (Rowan & Littlefield, 2013).


Runaway ad for a slave named Titus, later to be known as Colonel Tye
Runaway ad for a slave named Titus, later to be known as Colonel Tye

Rotating_globe-small.gifFor a discussion of the question of whether African Americans supported the colonists or the British, see Dunmore's Proclamation: A Time to Choose from Colonial Williamsburg.


Joseph Galloway was a Loyalist during the American Revolution
Joseph Galloway was a Loyalist during the American Revolution

Loyalists During the Revolution


For information on those who supported the British, see Loyalists During the American Revolution

See also, Loyalists and Loyalism in the American Revolution from The Ohio State University.

primary_sources.PNGPlain Truth by James Chalmers, written in response to Thomas Paine's Common Sense.
Go here for Selected Paragraphs from Plain Truth with original and abridged text

multicultural.pngFor more, see Africans in America: The Revolutionary War
  • 10,000 African Americans escaped, died or were killed during the Revolution.
  • 5,000 Blacks served in the Continental Army.
  • In 1775, George Washington barred recruitment for further Black soldiers; he later permitted Rhode Island to raise a regiment of free blacks and slaves.
  • Lord Dunmore issued a proclamation of freedom to slaves who supported the British cause; Colonel Tye led a brigade of 800 Black Loyalists in New York and New Jersey.

Biography icon for wiki.pngColonel Tye was a feared guerilla leader of Loyalist Blacks during the Revolution.

rotating gif.gifSee also, Grade 5.17 for information on the roles of African Americans and women during the Revolution.