<Standard 7.23 ........................................................................................................................................................................... Standard 7.25>

On a historical map of the Mediterranean area, locate Greece and trace the extent of its influence to 300 BC/BCE. On a modern map of the Mediterranean area, Europe, England and the Middle East, and the Indian subcontinent, locate England, France, Greece, Italy, Spain and other countries in the Balkan Peninsula, Crete, Egypt, India, the Middle East, Pakistan, and Turkey.


This page focuses on the geography of ancient Greece and the larger Mediterranean area as well as the modern countries of the region.

Topics on this page:

Influence of Greece to 300 BCE
  • Alexander the Great's Empire
Modern Day Middle East
  • Map Resources


Focus Question: What was the extent of Greece's influence to 300 BCE?


1) As the different tribes that made up Greece became more unified and advanced, they began to expand. Partly due to population pressures on the main land and partly due to political interests, Greeks started to populate islands (such as Ionia) and create colonies as far west as Southern Italy and Sicily, and as far North and East as the Black Sea.
Image from MrBurnett.net
Image from MrBurnett.net


2) Because of the geography of the land (with so many peninsulas and coastal areas) it made sense that the Greeks would always be looking seaward, and therefore have a predisposition towards travel. Eventually there were over 1,000 communities over this great expanse of land. But as spread out as they were, they were united by sea travel.

3) Some points of interest:
  • The Greek city of Massilia became what is now Marseilles, in Southern France
    • The Greeks colonized the coast of Spain as well. The Phoenicians, however, pushed them out—but not before the Greeks obtained knowledge of their alphabet, which they adapted for their own use.
      • Eventually there were over 1,000 communities over this great expanse of land. But as spread out as they were, they were united by sea travel.


Map icon.pngMap Resources

Screen Shot 2016-10-28 at 12.13.15 PM.pngFor more awesome material, see Time Elapse Maps for AP
World History.
Multimedia.png
womens history.jpgWomen in Classical Greece
multicultural.png

Screen Shot 2017-02-07 at 11.18.58 AM.pngDevelopment of the Greek Alphabet


Alexander the Great's Empire


rotating gif.gifFor more link to Grade 7.31

Although not a Greek himself (he was Macedonian), the empire built by Alexander the Great was of utter importance to the spread of Greek thought and culture.
  • In just a few short years, he had managed to tie together one of the largest empires ever by conquering the Achaemenid empire in the year 331 B.C after the Battle of Guagamela.
  • His territory spread from the Balkan Peninsula all the way to India, including Egypt, Mesopotamia and Persia. As a result, Alexander connected the newly unified Macedonian Kingdom and Greek city states with the known civilizations of eastern world.
  • His armies not only conquered all the land, they were also responsible for introducing the Middle East to Greek thought from the philosophers who themselves had influenced Alexander.
Alexander the Great's Empire at its height.
Alexander the Great's Empire at its height.


Focus Question: What countries make up the modern-day Mediterranean area?


external image map-mei-2005.gif
Students should be able to locate on a modern map: Europe, The Middle East, and the Indian Subcontinent. Specific countries include: England, France, Greece, Italy, Spain, Crete Egypt, India, Pakistan, and Turkey.

The Middle East (highlighted in red) on the map http://www.unc.edu/mideast/where/mei-2005.shtml.

rotating gif.gifFor more see Grade 6, World Geography: Middle East

map-ancient-rome-2.jpgMap Resources


Interactive Map of Mediterranean Sea

Link here for an interactive map of the evolution of Ancient Greece


game_icon.svg.pngMiddle East Map Game(Drag the names of the countries to their spot on the map).


external image Joystick_black_red_petri_01.svgAn Interactive map/game for locating key geographical landmarks in Ancient Greece

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION


Maps of Ancient Greece



beginnings_hist_greece.jpg
http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/historical/shepherd/greece_362.jpg

Shepard, William R. (2005). Perry-Castañeda Library Map Collection Historical Maps of Europe. Retrieved February 10, 2007, from University of Texas Library Web site: http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/historical/shepherd/beginnings_hist_greece.jpg




greece_362.jpg

Shepard, William R. (2005). Perry-Castañeda Library Map Collection Historical Maps of Europe. Retrieved February 10, 2007, from University of Texas Library Web site: