Poster, December 1940
Poster, December 1940

Topics on the Page

Rosie and Riverter and the American Homefront
Teaching and Learning Resources
Fly Girls
Top Secret Rosies
Code Girls


Rosie the Riverter and the American Homefront


Social Changes During the War, from Digital History


Partners in Winning the War: American Women in World War II, National Women's History Museum



Women Replace Men in the Workforce from Oakland Museum of California

  • 6 million women joined the workforce
  • 200,000 served in the military


Rosie the Riverter, from Learn North Carolina


Screen Shot 2017-04-25 at 10.36.54 AM.pngWhat Rosie the Riveter Would Make Today


Tending the Homefront: The Many Roles of Bay Area Women during World War II, National Park Service

primary_sources.PNGRosie's Pictures: Select Images Relating to American Women Workers During World War II, Library of Congress


Selected World War II Records of Federal Agencies in New England, National Archives at Boston


Recruitment Poster, 1940s
Recruitment Poster, 1940s

Screen Shot 2016-01-04 at 11.31.08 AM.pngTeaching and Learning Resources

Beyond Rosie the Riveter: Women's Contributions during World War II



Women in the U.S. Military in World War II



Women Heroes of World War II: The Pacific Theatre. 15 Stories of Resistance, Rescue, Sabotage & Survival. Kathryn J. Atwood. Chicago Review Press, 2016

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WASPS in front of a TB-25 Mitchell Trainer, 1944
WASPS in front of a TB-25 Mitchell Trainer, 1944

Fly Girls


Female World War II Pilots: The Original Fly Girls.

As the Magazine of History (Volume 24, no. 3, July 2010) points out, "from 1942 to 1944, about one thousand WASPs flew over twelve thousand newly manufactured aircraft from factories to military bases. They also towed targets for gunnery practice and tested repaired aircraft. Despite their skill and sacrifice on the home front (thirty-eight women pilots died in service) they were denied military status and benefits during the war and the program was abruptly ended in 1944, due largely to opposition from male service pilots."



Top Secret Rosies


Women breaking naval codes during World War II
Women breaking naval codes during World War II

Code Girls


More than half the American code-breaking force was female, about 10,000 women

Many were college graduates who had been excluded from math and engineering fields, but were now needed for their talent and expertise.

Source: "What Can We Learn from Women in Wartime," The New York Times (November 12, 2017)

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How American Women Codebreakers of World War II Helped Win the War, Smithsonian (October 2017)

The Secret History of the Female Code Breakers Who Helped Defeat the Nazis, Politico Magazine (October 10, 2017)




rotating gif.gifLink to Companion Women's History Pages on Women in World War I